• Robert Cheung, RCM Scholar supported by the Soiree D'Or award, is an accomplished young classical pianist with extensive performing experience.
  • Robert Cheung, RCM Scholar supported by the Soiree D'Or award, is an accomplished young classical pianist with extensive performing experience.
  • Robert Cheung, RCM Scholar supported by the Soiree D'Or award, is an accomplished young classical pianist with extensive performing experience.
  • Robert Cheung, RCM Scholar supported by the Soiree D'Or award, is an accomplished young classical pianist with extensive performing experience.

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Robert Cheung plays Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G major

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Ravel’s G major Concerto was first performed in 1933.  It has a lively, jazz-influenced first movement.  The slow movement begins with a beautiful and nostalgic piano solo, leading to important contributions from flute and oboe.  The sparkling and rhythmic third movement brings the concerto to a brilliant conclusion.

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Robert Cheung plays Liszt’s ‘Un Sospiro’ (Grande Etudes de Concert No.3)

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‘Un Sospiro’ (‘A Sigh’) is the third of Liszt’s Trois Grande Études de Concert, and is one of his best-loved compositions.  It was composed in 1848, and features a fine melody which is surrounded above and below by rapid, crossed-hands arpeggios.

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Robert Cheung plays Grieg’s Piano Sonata, Op.7

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Edvard Grieg’s only piano sonata, the Sonata in E minor, Op 7, is a comparatively early work, composed during the course of eleven days in mid-1865. The sonata is influenced by Grieg’s studies in Leipzig and by the Danish composers Niels Gade and J.P.E. Hartmann. A forthright Allegro moderato is followed by a dreamy Andante molto and a rather stern Alla menuetto, ma poco piu lento, with its charming central section. The rhythmic urgency of the Finale has echoes of Schumann, bringing the sonata to a thrilling conclusion.

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Robert Cheung plays Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No.2

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One of the best-loved of all Romantic piano concertos, Rachmaninov completed this in 1901, having composed the second and third movements during a stay in Italy the previous year.  Extensive excerpts were used in David Lean’s 1945 film Brief Encounter.

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Robert Cheung plays Liszt’s Liebstraume No.3

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This first appeared in 1850 as one of three songs for high voice and piano, and as transcriptions for piano two-hands. The songs were based on poems by Uhland and Freiligrath depicting three different forms of love. Number 3 is about unconditional mature love, and is the most popular of the set. The dreamy main theme is memorable, requiring emotional depth, but there are also passages that require dexterous finger work and a very high degree of technical ability.

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Robert Cheung plays Schubert’s Impromptu Op.90, No.3

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Schubert’s eight Impromptus for solo piano were composed in 1827, a year before his death at the age of 32. They were published in two sets of four: the first was published in the composer’s lifetime as Op.90, and the second set was published after his death.

Impromptu Op 90 No 3 was composed in G flat major, but the publisher transposed it to G major because with only one sharp it made it easier for amateurs to play and therefore easier to sell. Here Robert plays the version in the original key. The peaceful lyrical melody over the flowing accompaniment is one of Schubert’s most romantic and well known creations.

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Robert Cheung plays Chopin’s Ballade No.1 in G Minor, Op.23

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Chopin was a pioneer of the Ballade as a dramatic one-movement piece. His Ballades are among the most technically challenging pieces to play in the classical piano repertoire.

Ballade No.1 was completed in 1835, and reflects Chopin’s loneliness far away from his beloved Poland. It may have been inspired by the poem ‘Konrad Wallenrod’, a story of patriotic vengeance and a thinly veiled attack on the Russian domination of Poland.

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